Oldfields Paintbrush Review my paintbrush

Updated Dec 20, 2022 | Posted Aug 13, 2019 | Product Review, Tools | 8 comments

I was recently given a set of Oldfield paintbrushes to try out and review from Andy Cherry from My Paintbrush. These are brushes that I’ve wanted to try out for a long time. They are really popular in Australia, I have a friend in Oz that had told me about them but I was unable to get them from anywhere in the UK… Until now. This is my Oldfields paintbrush review, I hope you find it useful.

 

The Paintbrushes I was Send to Try

oldfields paintbrush review

I like the way these paintbrushes are labelled so you know what they should be used for, which is good idea, rather than trying to have one brush to do everything. I tried them out on their designed purposes and this is how I got on..

Oldfields Oval Paintbrush for Ceilings Walls and Doors

 

My first impressions of this brush were very positive. It seemed like a well-made paintbrush with an oval stock. It is so comfortable in your hand, it just seems to fit so well. My usual  brush for cutting in walls and ceilings are from the 3” Hamilton Expressions range. These are a really big brush that holds loads of paint. The Oldfields are much daintier, so I didn’t expect them to win me over. It’s only a 2.5” with a smaller handle.

As soon as I started using it, I found it was so effortless to cut in nice sharp lines and despite my doubts, it holds loads of paint! I used this brush for a solid week on emulsion, bagged up each day then washed out on the weekend.

It’s hard to tell long term how they’ll last from my short term testing, so I thought I’d put it through its paces and use it whilst painting exterior masonry walls (not what its designed for, but a good test). I wash it out after and the brush held it’s shape nicely.

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My next job was cutting in a whole 4 bed house. I was short on time, so I started out using my Hamilton Expressions brush (stick to what I know), but after using the Oldfields, it just wasn’t as nice. I soon switched back to the Oldfields and it still performed better, even after its masonry wall stint.

 

Oldfields Cutting in and Moulding  Paintbrush

 

This paintbrush is a lot different to the wall brush. It has a thin, straight stock with angled bristles and a long thin handle (that kind of felt like holding a fitch). Now I wouldn’t use this for cutting in walls as its too thin to hold a decent amount of paint. I tried it out on some skirts and architraves and wasn’t overly impressed. Although the bristles stayed uniform and it was good for precise control (like getting in the corner of the top of skirting on an internal corner etc), but the bristles were too flimsy for my liking. I expect people who like the Blaze brush would like these, but for me it’s just not got enough meat to it.

 

Windows, Cornices and Architrave Paintbrush

 

After being a bit disappointed with the previous brush, I didn’t have much hope for this one. Although the Oldfields Windows, Cornices and Architraves Paintbrush is a bit thicker with straight cut bristles and a thicker handle (still not as comfortable as the first brush). I switched to this brush straight from the last to carry on with architraves and skirting boards, and what a difference! It held far more paint than I had expected! Another thing I noticed that was quite odd, laying off with this brush seemed to give the paint better opacity, I guess this is down to the evenness it lays off, and this makes it great for paints like water-based gloss

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It’s a lot different and a bit bigger to what I’m used to using on woodwork (I usually use a 1.5/2” Hamilton prestige synthetic) so it took a bit of getting used to, but once I did it was brilliant. The control on it was good for corners as mentioned above, also for those bits behind hinges etc.

 

Verdict – The Oldfields Paint Brush Review

 

The Oldfields wall and ceiling paintbrush is amazing and I definitely want (actually need) more of these brushes. I cant praise them enough.

The cutting in and moulding brush is a good brush, but I’d probably use it as a laying off brush. If you like the Proform Blaze then you would like it.

The windows, cornices and architrave brush is a really great brush. I will definitely buy some to have on board and it will come in useful.

They are available from My Paintbrush. You can see their website by clicking here  So if you want to give them a try (that I highly recommend you do) head over to mypaintbrush.co.uk

Thank you for reading my Oldfields Paint Brush Review

Updated Dec 20, 2022 | Posted Aug 13, 2019 | 8 comments

8 Comments

  1. Jason savagr

    I’ve been using them for about 4 months or so. After multiple wash outs, the filaments still hold their shape and the stock is still soft. This is my go to brush now and I’ll definitely be buying more.

    Reply
  2. Noor Naseri

    I was wondering to order some of this prushe

    Reply
    • Andy

      Cannot fault the oval brushes ,they are superb .
      Been searching for an alternative to Purdue brushes for a while now because they are not of the same quality that that they used to be.

      Reply
  3. Carlos

    How need to do or where is the website to buy a oldfield paint brushes

    Reply
    • Andy

      Carlos,I buy mine from my paintbrush.co.uk.

      Reply
      • GARY

        Loved the oval 2″” ,in acrylic for a month or so,but, when I started using it in oil based gloss, the bristles fell out in big clumps.such a shame,because I really loved it

        Reply
  4. Adam Jon

    I’ve just used my oldfields ‘cutting in and mouldings’ brush for the first time to cut in my bathroom walls and corners etc and was amazed! What a brush, I’ve been using Wooster brushes for months now as they seem to just suit me, but wow, I’m definitely ordering a couple of the others after reading this! Thanks buddy, nice review also 👌🏽

    Reply
  5. Phil Gauci

    Been using the 2 1/2 inch Oval brush which is great for cutting in but unfortunately excessive bristle loss so won’t be buying again.

    Reply

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